Anonymous attack cost PayPal £3.5 million

Posted: November 26, 2012 in IT Security News
Tags: , ,

AnonymousAt the moment, one of the main defendants in the trial of the protesters ‘Operation Payback’ is a 22-year-old Christopher Weatherhead, which in the days of the Anonymous hacker attacks on PayPal studied at the University of Northampton. At the moment, the activist has denied any involvement in the crime.

Recall that the number of DDoS-attacks conducted participants Anonymous hacker movement in the period between 1 August 2010 and 22 January 2011. Activists were targeted for web-sites of companies MasterCard, Visa, and the portals of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry and the British Association of the Phonographic Industry, etc. Later attracted the attention of attackers payment system PayPal, which then refused to transfer a donation administration web-site Wikileaks.

Apart Weatherhead-accused are the three other young men, aged 18 to 27 years. Initially, they are all fully admitted their guilt. However, according to the Prosecutor Sandip Patel, one of them confessed to the attack on the portal of the supporters of anti-piracy later changed his mind and said that he wanted to ‘attack the artists.’

The expert also said that the incident was not just the music companies, but also suffered a ‘huge economic loss’ payment system PayPal. Loss of service, which was forced to purchase additional software for protection from DDoS-attacks, hire an expert in information security, and unable to function for several days, in the order of £ 3.5 million.

According to Patel, two music companies, representing the prosecution, have lost nearly 12,000 pounds. “This incident demonstrates the dark side of the Internet”, – concluded the prosecutor.

Links:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/

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